Review: Divergent by Veronica Roth

Divergent by Veronica Roth

Divergent by Veronica Roth
Series: Divergent series, Book #1
Pages: 487 pp.
Genre: Dystopian YA
Published: Apr. 2011, Harper Collins

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue–Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is–she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are–and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she’s chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she’s kept hidden from everyone because she’s been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her. [GOODREADS]

 

I admit, I jumped on the Hype Train with this one, since I didn’t really have an inclination to read it on my own. After downloading Divergent on a whim when it was on sale, it sat for months on my Kindle before I finally decided it was time to see what all the hoopla was about.

I finished it in less than a day.

When I first started reading, the similarities between it and The Hunger Games were glaringly obvious (dystopian setting, teens forced to make a life-altering decision), but it only took a few chapters before Divergent started branching off into its own adrenaline-pumping storyline. When it did, my fingers were swiping as fast as I could read!

Like Katniss, Tris is a strong female lead, but I found her a bit more compassionate and a lot less self righteous. Unlike Katniss, she wasn’t a natural fighter and not the best at combat — I actually appreciated this because it made her character more believable. Not to say she was weak — girlfriend was scrappy! — but it’s refreshing to read about a heroine who isn’t perfect at everything right off the bat. Plus it gives her character room to grow as the series progresses.

I could go into the whole “Divergent” aspect, but I don’t feel like it was the real crux of the story (at least not yet) — this book was more about character development. Which leads me to… Four. Oh, Four. So brooding & deep. There’s just something about him… I already know he is a reader favorite and rightfully so! I haven’t gotten around to them yet, but I will be reading the Four novellas because he’s got a complicated history that I’d love to learn more about. His feelings for Tris were swoon-worthy but I have to say, I didn’t quite get WHY he was so drawn to her so quickly. Luckily, Tris doesn’t either, which makes this subplot easier to follow along with, since both readers and Tris get an explanation as to why Four is so smitten.

One thing that really stood out to me was how violent this book is. Between the hand-to-hand combat and the multiple shoot-outs, I found myself cringing while reading at times. As someone who watches gory crime dramas (Dexter, Criminal Minds, etc.), I’m pretty immune to stuff like that, but Ms. Roth is one hell of a writer if she can make me squeamish with just words. I’m counting that as a plus.

Obviously Divergent is part of a trilogy — one that I feel obligated to see through. I mean, I owe it to Four, right? ;)